Flucht Ins Ungewisse

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Die Familie Pope ist bereits seit dem Vietnamkrieg vor dem FBI auf der Flucht. Als ihr Sohn Danny sich in die Tochter seines ihn musikalisch fördernden Musiklehrers verliebt, muss sein Vater eine schwere Entscheidung treffen. Die Flucht ins Ungewisse (Originaltitel: Running on Empty) ist ein US-​amerikanisches Filmdrama des Regisseurs Sidney Lumet aus dem Jahr Flucht ins Ungewisse ist der Filmtitel mehrerer Spielfilme: Die Flucht ins Ungewisse, US-amerikanisches Filmdrama des Regisseurs Sidney Lumet aus dem Jahr. growingbetter.co - Kaufen Sie Die Flucht ins Ungewisse günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Im Hamburger Rathaus zeichnet die Ausstellung»Flucht ins Ungewisse«Lebenswege Exilierter nach, die zwischen 19aus der.

Flucht Ins Ungewisse

Terra Utopia – Band 5 W. A. Hary – Flucht ins Ungewisse 1. eBookAuflage – November © vssverlag Hermann Schladt Titelbild: Armin Bappert unter. Klaus Diedrich C S ‚ß W „Ute w S ‚m Flucht Zerstörte Kindheit Flucht ins Ungewisse Klaus Diedrich Flucht ins Ungewisse Zerstörte Kindheit. Front Cover. Schon deshalb ist "Die Flucht ins Ungewisse" eine Zumutung. Der Film macht es weder den Märchenfreunden noch ihren abgeklärten.

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Dirk van den Boom - Flucht ins Ungewisse - Sternkreuzer Proxima, Folge 1

Return to Book Page. Preview — Star Wars by Kevin J. Anderson Goodreads Author. As the war between the Republic and the scattered remnants of the Empire continues, two children--the Jedi twins--will come into their powers in a universe on the brink of vast changes and challenges.

In this time of turmoil and discovery, an extraordinary new Star Wars saga begins While Luke Skywalker takes the first step toward setting up an academy to train a new ord As the war between the Republic and the scattered remnants of the Empire continues, two children--the Jedi twins--will come into their powers in a universe on the brink of vast changes and challenges.

While Luke Skywalker takes the first step toward setting up an academy to train a new order of Jedi Knights, Han Solo and Chewbacca are taken prisoner on the planet Kessel and forced to work in the fathomless depths of a spice mine.

But when Han and Chewie break away, they flee desperately to a secret Imperial research laboratory surrounded by a cluster of black holes--and go from one danger to a far greater one On Kessel, Luke picks up the trail of his two friends, only to come face-to-face with a weapon so awesome, it can wipe out an entire solar system.

It is a death ship called the Sun Crusher, invented by a reclusive genius and piloted by none other than Han himself Get A Copy.

Hardcover , pages. More Details Original Title. Kessel Yavin. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Star Wars , please sign up. Hey Anyone out there that can tell me if there is any good star wars books without the original characters Princess Layia Han Solo Luke Skywalker?

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Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Star Wars: Flucht ins Ungewisse. This was the first Star Wars expanded universe book I ever read, and as mediocre as it is, it's primarily responsible for my obsession with Star Wars and the EU throughout my last two years of high school.

Simply by existing, it was awesome back then. Now, though, I have higher standards. It was fun to revisit this book that I liked when I was sixteen, again, mostly because it existed, but nostalgia was really the only reason I had an This was the first Star Wars expanded universe book I ever read, and as mediocre as it is, it's primarily responsible for my obsession with Star Wars and the EU throughout my last two years of high school.

It was fun to revisit this book that I liked when I was sixteen, again, mostly because it existed, but nostalgia was really the only reason I had any fun reading it this second time around.

Jedi Search is the first book by Kevin J. Anderson, professional fanfic writer, in his Jedi Academy trilogy, which picks up after Timothy Zahn's much much much much better Thrawn trilogy.

Ostensibly, it's about Luke taking charge and forming a new Jedi Academy, recruiting and searching for new Jedi across the galaxy to come to his new school and reboot the Jedi order.

Of course, the situation is also complicated by the presence of the obligatory frustrated Remnant of the Defeated Empire character, who is much better served in the Thrawn trilogy than here.

Here we've got Admiral Daala, a prodigy who's been sequestered in a top secret black hole cluster for ten years doing research for the Empire, and she and her installation have no idea what's been going on in the outside world.

Then there's a third plot with Han and Chewie and Kessel that seems designed solely to bring in a key character, but it ends up feeling shoehorned in and coincidental.

Cool that we finally get to visit Kessel, though. Meanwhile all this is happening, Leia is busy having a mental breakdown about Han and her children, all the while stuff seems to be falling apart.

My main frustration with KJA as a writer is that he's all ideas, no execution. He had all the bones of a fun Star Wars story here, but the way he writes it just ruins the whole thing.

His dialogue is cheesy and not lifelike at all, his character work is disgraceful, and most of the time character actions occur because something needs to happen in the plot rather than because it's something that character would organically do.

Many of the developments are insulting to me as a human person, as a Star Wars fan, and as a woman most of these insults occur in the second two books.

This book is the best of the series solely because all of that potential is still there, but by books two and three, it's piddled off, like a bad puppy on your favorite rug.

But even by the end of this book, you can see the potential dying. Let's break it down by the four plot points I mentioned above: The supposed Jedi search: This book is supposed to feature Luke and Co.

Lando is wasted on the stupidest plot of all time, finding himself searching for a potential Jedi while attending Umgullian blob races.

Yes, blob races. And the guy doesn't even turn out to be a Jedi. At least thirty pages full of a complete waste of time.

Luke only finds three himself. And he doesn't even have to work very hard to do it. It's not satisfying on a story level at all.

Not to mention it's apparent while reading these scenes that KJA has no idea how to write Luke as a competent Jedi Master.

His Luke can't even figure out how to sense life signs or take a quick walk across lava. It's horribly frustrating. But thanks for misleading me, I guess.

Admiral Daala and the Empire: Admiral Daala could have been such a good character. A woman admiral in a notoriously sexist institution like the Empire.

A leader who has been out of the loop for ten years and the universe has moved on without her. A sudden influx of Imperial troops and power revives the efforts of the dying Empire.

But none of it was. Daala's characterization was almost exclusively focused on her obsession with Grand Moff Tarkin, who was her mentor, and as she notes almost every time she remembers him, "her lover" as well.

Which is icky in the book, and icky on the part of the author. Also, for a supposed military genius, Daala is a moron.

She is not good at her job. Lastly, the idea of Maw Installation being hidden in the black hole cluster is good if you don't think about it, but doesn't hold up even remotely if you do.

The time dilation from being near one black hole, let alone a cluster of them, would make every event in this book impossible.

Lazy science is lazy. We get Han and Chewie being captured by an old frenemy and forced to become slaves in the spice mines of Kessel, and upon escaping are forced into an even more terrifying situation in the black hole cluster.

It's terrifying, and there be monsters down there. But it also seems like this entire story was developed solely so Han could meet Kyp Durron and bring him into the fold.

I suppose you could hand-wave that away by saying the Force works in mysterious ways, but Anderson doesn't even bother to do that!

The bad guy at Kessel is gross, and not in a fun way, either. Like, raping women and eating his own children gross.

He doesn't get her. At all. KJA's Leia is a nagging worrywart, whose achievements as a statesman are completely undercut by her unreasonable anger at Han for not being there when their twins return from their two year exile.

He pulled it out of his bum for dramatic purposes. It makes zero sense in the Star Wars universe. And 2 Leia would NOT be mad at Han for not being there, and she wouldn't be making comments all the time about him being unreliable and off to sow his wild oats.

Those shouldn't even be issues in their marriage. Leia trusts Han. Han is dependable. Her first assumption should have been that something was wrong and to go looking for him, but KJA needed her in Coruscant, not off on a rescue mission, so instead she acts like a moron.

The stuff where she deals with all the diplomatic stuff was harmless, but not exactly thrilling. It's mostly set-up for the next two books.

This first book was okay, but the second two devolve considerably, and aren't worth your time. Seriously, don't bother reading this series unless you are a EU completist.

If you're reading it for nostalgia purposes, you'll just be disappointed. There are so many other books, so many other Star Wars books specifically, that you would do better to spend your time on.

View all 6 comments. Shelves: star-wars. Painful, painful, painful. I wanted more, had to have it, so I quickly snapped up these from my local bookseller.

The smile on my face soon faded as I waded through the first book. None of the characters sounded like I imagined them The worst offenses were against characters that Zahn had created KJA's interpretat Painful, painful, painful.

The added subplots were, well lame. Lame is probably the best word to describe every original though KJA tried to shoehorn in. View all 5 comments.

The Good: An old-school entry in the Star Wars Expanded Universe, this novel brings the action and heroism you've come to expect from the franchise.

Kevin J. Anderson's writing is fabulous, and the story really took me to a galaxy far, far away. Though the ending wasn't a cliffhanger, I can't wait to see where the trilogy goes from here.

The Bad: Minor complaints: one or two profanities, too much advertising in the back, etc. All small potatoes when you consider how good this book was.

Conclusion: The Good: An old-school entry in the Star Wars Expanded Universe, this novel brings the action and heroism you've come to expect from the franchise.

Stackpole at a local garage sale. Not only did it inspire me to read more Star Wars novels, it rejuvenated my love for reading, which I had lost years ago to television, movies, and video games.

Though I've read the entire Jedi Academy trilogy at least twice before, I felt it deserved at least one more go Kevin J Anderson is given the chance to contribute to one of the biggest and most beloved science fiction universes ever created, and he comes up with blob races.

A significant portion of the book is dedicated to blobs. More impressively, the entire blob subplot ends up amounting to nothing more than Lando Calrissian on vacation.

The entire section could be removed without affecting the plot of the novel. This is probably the worst of several uninspired decisions made in this book.

Despit Kevin J Anderson is given the chance to contribute to one of the biggest and most beloved science fiction universes ever created, and he comes up with blob races.

Despite this, several important characters are introduced in this novel, along with the Maw Installation, the most interesting plotline of the story.

Hopefully this is only a poor introduction and the rest of the trilogy will be more entertaining. View 2 comments.

Unfortunately, Moruth Doole has no intentions of joining and sends Han and Chewie into the spice mines, where they meet the Force sensitive, Kyp Durron.

Meanwhile, Leia holds things together on Coruscant, worrying for her husband, and Luke begins his Jedi Search, finding two candidates, Gantoris and Streen.

I Liked: Kevin J. Anderson is often castigated for his Star Wars entries, but I honestly don't see why. No, his books aren't like Zahn's, but they are still "Star Wars".

The settings feel right, the characters are pretty good, and the events as well. While the mission is kinda goofy, it is interesting to see Kessell and its place in the universe.

Also, I enjoyed seeing Luke go out to find new Jedi candidates. It's really cool to see the rise of the new Jedi especially with the knowledge of the prequels, something I didn't have when I read the book many years ago.

And I can sorta stretch my imagination to believe that a Maw Installation would have been created for the super-secret construction that occurs.

The main characters are done well enough that I don't question them. Han and Chewie play a large role, and they are done well. Luke is, likewise, well done.

As for minor characters, Kyp Durron is really interesting. It's neat, particularly knowing where he ends up in the New Jedi Order.

Admiral Daala is also interesting. I Didn't Like: I am not sure why Kessell is such a big deal. It almost seems like a place that the New Republic would want to break down, like a drug lab, instead of ally with.

And the sleazy alien who runs it Uh huh, let's ally with seedy characters. Really gives the New Republic legitimacy, eh? Weren't they wondering after a year or two why Tarkin hadn't called?

Would it have been so hard to peek out and transmit a "Hey, what's up? Ha, got me laughing in stitches over that one. Leia doesn't do much of anything other than wangst at home about Han being gone.

She vacillates between worry and being mad that he is "off" gambling. Then, she is shy about asking Lando and Luke to look into it.

Leia from the trilogy or from the Thrawn Trilogy would have no problem with it. In fact, she'd probably be leading the expedition.

Since her kids are dumped off with Winter on the "hidden planet" and she can conveniently leave her job when the plot requires it Luke Skywalker is too powerful.

There is a difference between a Jedi who can hold his own and a Jedi that can do everything.

Look at Yoda. The guy walked around with a cane or on a hoverchair. He wasn't perfect. He didn't smash everyone to bits.

But if Luke were him, he would be using the Force to walk upside down or something crazy. And then, his complete ignorance of Gantoris' Dark Side.

For someone as powerful as Luke, he should be like, "Uh, warning! Qui Xux is the. I despise her. I can't believe she exists.

She is too stupid to live. Every single myth about scientists or doctors or people with intelligence is exploited in her. She is gorgeous, but also naive beyond belief.

The Death Star was a mining tool? Uh, take a look at the name, girlfriend. That should be a clue. The World Devastators a roving mining colony?

Girl, you need to get out more. I hadn't really liked her the first time I read, and time has definitely NOT made me more sympathetic to her.

Lock her up and throw away the key. Stereotypes like "sleazy" Twi'Leks that are only involved in crime crop up.

That really torques me. Lando's mission with the blob races is completely irrelevant and tossed in to make sure all the big guys from the movie appear.

As for the audiobook, large chunks of Daala's history disappear such as her affair with Tarkin and Leia's contribution disappear I believe there were more parts with her on Coruscant besides whining about Han.

Also, the reader pronounces words incorrectly. It was grating after a while. Qui Xux is goregous. Han, Chewie, and Kyp fight their way out of the spice mines of Kessell.

The people of Eol Sha have to be moved because their planet is destroying itself. Overall: I know I complained a lot, but the story actually isn't too bad.

It's a nice Star Wars romp. I liked Han and Chewie in the spice mines well, not being there, but their adventure there and Luke's "Jedi Search" was pretty darn cool.

No, it's not brilliant, but it was enjoyable. Read it if you are bored or have to complete the whole series. It was on page 15 of this book that I realized that this simply would not be a book I enjoyed reading: "During the previous year of violent strife, Luke had been whisked away to the resurrected Emperor's stronghold in the galactic core, and there he had allowed himself to learn the dark side.

He had become the Emperor's chief lieutenant, just like his father, Darth Vader. I wanted an expansion of that Universe, and I thought Zahn delivered because he crafted a trilogy of books that was true to the movies and true to the characters.

What I did not want was a series of books that took the characters in a direction I did not wish to see them go, and Luke joining a resurrected Emperor was just to hokey for me.

I kept reading for awhile, but eventually had to put this book down, and made the realization that The Jedi Academy Trilogy would simply not be more me.

When it comes to further reading in the Star Wars expanded Universe, I believe I'll read the rest of Zahn's output and call it a day.

View all 3 comments. As is the case with any genre of writing, there are some authors who can really get it done for their readers and some who can't.

The whole time I was reading Timothy Zahn's excellent Thrawn Trilogy, I kept finding myself being pleasantly surprised at how much I was enjoying the storyline and at how well Zahn conjured the spirit of those familiar characters while rendering new characters who flow seamlessly into the already well-established storyline from the films.

Zahn's dialogue made me feel As is the case with any genre of writing, there are some authors who can really get it done for their readers and some who can't.

Zahn's dialogue made me feel that Harrison Ford himself was delivering Han Solo's lines, and the intrigue with both the smugglers and the newly revamped Imperial Fleet, headed by Grand Admiral Thrawn, kept me turning pages long into the night.

I was so into the Thrawn Trilogy, in fact, that when it ended I immediately decided to continue geeking out and dive into the next trilogy on the EU timeline.

The next trilogy, unfortunately, is this piece of shit, written by Kevin J. I would not call into question Anderson's love of the Star Wars universe or his ability to keep events in line with the EU timeline established by Zahn a few years prior to this trilogy's publication.

However, being a fan does not make one a good writer, and despite the fact that Anderson has penned some twenty sci-fi novels including other Star Wars titles , it became apparent in the first twenty pages the difference in writing ability of the Hugo Award winning Zahn and this guy.

The dialogue is painful. In particular, C-3PO is so badly rendered that he comes off less as a petulant protocol droid and more like a bitchy queen at some New york party who just can't have a good time and must whine about something constantly.

I could probably look past the clunky dialogue too, if it weren't for the fact that the story itself just sucks.

I kept reading on, hoping to get to some good action a la Thrawn, but instead I eventually ended up with Lando, 3PO and R2 on a distant planet trying to locate a potential Jedi candidate who had shown a knack for betting big money the right blob race.

Yeah, I just typed the words "blob race" in reference to a major plot point of a book I was reading on my own limited time.

This was after Han and Chewie, and Luke, on separate planets, found themselves at the mercy of captors who were either so inept or so badly written or both that they made the most lame stormtrooper seem like MacArthur in strategic ability.

I got about four pages into the blob race arena, smelled the stupidest pod raceing scene ever shaping up, and dove into an escape pod.

I have acquaintances who have read all, or almost all, of the novels in the EU, and I'll admit that for a brief moment after finishing Thrawn that thought had occurred to me.

However, as I already mentioned, Kevin J. Anderson had penned several of those other novels as well, and I'll not be reading any of his any time in the near future, and likely at all.

Maybe if I get caught in a cell with a Rancor and a copy of his stand alone novel Darksaber, but that's the only case I can conjure up that would drive me to pick up any of Anderson's cringeworthy writing again.

I hope the next Star Wars book I pick up will help cleanse the taste of this bantha dung from my mouth, but it will have to wait, because after opting out of this trilogy, I think I'm going to stop geeking out for the time being and just rest on the Star Wars-y enjoyment I got from reading the Thrawn Trilogy and not try to "Force" the feeling again for a while.

I loved being reunited with some of my favorite people in the Star Wars universe, and getting to witness their adventures after everything that's happened in the films.

I think, of all the stories, I was most interested in Han's individual arc, but it all works together to bring it to a solid ending.

Pretty good series starter, and I'm looking forward to reading the rest! I really liked this book and am looking forward to reading the next one in the series!

I thought the writing was good and the storyline is really interesting. I would definitely recommend this book to any Star Wars Fan.

Every scene with her, something is mentioned about her hair. I just found that a little odd but funny.

Anyone else notice that? Overall, this is a good book! The democratic state that once was Germany has become a totalitarian system that persecutes Director: Kai Wessel.

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Metacritic Reviews. At least thirty pages more info of a complete waste of time. Simply by existing, it was awesome back. View all subjects. Read article Doole is a space frog. Anderson had penned several of those other novels as well, link I'll not be reading any of his any time in the near future, and likely at all. Flucht Ins Ungewisse

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More impressively, the entire blob subplot ends up amounting to nothing more than Lando Calrissian on vacation. The entire section could be removed without affecting the plot of the novel.

This is probably the worst of several uninspired decisions made in this book. Despit Kevin J Anderson is given the chance to contribute to one of the biggest and most beloved science fiction universes ever created, and he comes up with blob races.

Despite this, several important characters are introduced in this novel, along with the Maw Installation, the most interesting plotline of the story.

Hopefully this is only a poor introduction and the rest of the trilogy will be more entertaining.

View 2 comments. Unfortunately, Moruth Doole has no intentions of joining and sends Han and Chewie into the spice mines, where they meet the Force sensitive, Kyp Durron.

Meanwhile, Leia holds things together on Coruscant, worrying for her husband, and Luke begins his Jedi Search, finding two candidates, Gantoris and Streen.

I Liked: Kevin J. Anderson is often castigated for his Star Wars entries, but I honestly don't see why. No, his books aren't like Zahn's, but they are still "Star Wars".

The settings feel right, the characters are pretty good, and the events as well. While the mission is kinda goofy, it is interesting to see Kessell and its place in the universe.

Also, I enjoyed seeing Luke go out to find new Jedi candidates. It's really cool to see the rise of the new Jedi especially with the knowledge of the prequels, something I didn't have when I read the book many years ago.

And I can sorta stretch my imagination to believe that a Maw Installation would have been created for the super-secret construction that occurs.

The main characters are done well enough that I don't question them. Han and Chewie play a large role, and they are done well.

Luke is, likewise, well done. As for minor characters, Kyp Durron is really interesting. It's neat, particularly knowing where he ends up in the New Jedi Order.

Admiral Daala is also interesting. I Didn't Like: I am not sure why Kessell is such a big deal. It almost seems like a place that the New Republic would want to break down, like a drug lab, instead of ally with.

And the sleazy alien who runs it Uh huh, let's ally with seedy characters. Really gives the New Republic legitimacy, eh?

Weren't they wondering after a year or two why Tarkin hadn't called? Would it have been so hard to peek out and transmit a "Hey, what's up?

Ha, got me laughing in stitches over that one. Leia doesn't do much of anything other than wangst at home about Han being gone. She vacillates between worry and being mad that he is "off" gambling.

Then, she is shy about asking Lando and Luke to look into it. Leia from the trilogy or from the Thrawn Trilogy would have no problem with it.

In fact, she'd probably be leading the expedition. Since her kids are dumped off with Winter on the "hidden planet" and she can conveniently leave her job when the plot requires it Luke Skywalker is too powerful.

There is a difference between a Jedi who can hold his own and a Jedi that can do everything. Look at Yoda.

The guy walked around with a cane or on a hoverchair. He wasn't perfect. He didn't smash everyone to bits. But if Luke were him, he would be using the Force to walk upside down or something crazy.

And then, his complete ignorance of Gantoris' Dark Side. For someone as powerful as Luke, he should be like, "Uh, warning! Qui Xux is the.

I despise her. I can't believe she exists. She is too stupid to live. Every single myth about scientists or doctors or people with intelligence is exploited in her.

She is gorgeous, but also naive beyond belief. The Death Star was a mining tool? Uh, take a look at the name, girlfriend.

That should be a clue. The World Devastators a roving mining colony? Girl, you need to get out more.

I hadn't really liked her the first time I read, and time has definitely NOT made me more sympathetic to her.

Lock her up and throw away the key. Stereotypes like "sleazy" Twi'Leks that are only involved in crime crop up.

That really torques me. Lando's mission with the blob races is completely irrelevant and tossed in to make sure all the big guys from the movie appear.

As for the audiobook, large chunks of Daala's history disappear such as her affair with Tarkin and Leia's contribution disappear I believe there were more parts with her on Coruscant besides whining about Han.

Also, the reader pronounces words incorrectly. It was grating after a while. Qui Xux is goregous.

Han, Chewie, and Kyp fight their way out of the spice mines of Kessell. The people of Eol Sha have to be moved because their planet is destroying itself.

Overall: I know I complained a lot, but the story actually isn't too bad. It's a nice Star Wars romp. I liked Han and Chewie in the spice mines well, not being there, but their adventure there and Luke's "Jedi Search" was pretty darn cool.

No, it's not brilliant, but it was enjoyable. Read it if you are bored or have to complete the whole series. It was on page 15 of this book that I realized that this simply would not be a book I enjoyed reading: "During the previous year of violent strife, Luke had been whisked away to the resurrected Emperor's stronghold in the galactic core, and there he had allowed himself to learn the dark side.

He had become the Emperor's chief lieutenant, just like his father, Darth Vader. I wanted an expansion of that Universe, and I thought Zahn delivered because he crafted a trilogy of books that was true to the movies and true to the characters.

What I did not want was a series of books that took the characters in a direction I did not wish to see them go, and Luke joining a resurrected Emperor was just to hokey for me.

I kept reading for awhile, but eventually had to put this book down, and made the realization that The Jedi Academy Trilogy would simply not be more me.

When it comes to further reading in the Star Wars expanded Universe, I believe I'll read the rest of Zahn's output and call it a day.

View all 3 comments. As is the case with any genre of writing, there are some authors who can really get it done for their readers and some who can't.

The whole time I was reading Timothy Zahn's excellent Thrawn Trilogy, I kept finding myself being pleasantly surprised at how much I was enjoying the storyline and at how well Zahn conjured the spirit of those familiar characters while rendering new characters who flow seamlessly into the already well-established storyline from the films.

Zahn's dialogue made me feel As is the case with any genre of writing, there are some authors who can really get it done for their readers and some who can't.

Zahn's dialogue made me feel that Harrison Ford himself was delivering Han Solo's lines, and the intrigue with both the smugglers and the newly revamped Imperial Fleet, headed by Grand Admiral Thrawn, kept me turning pages long into the night.

I was so into the Thrawn Trilogy, in fact, that when it ended I immediately decided to continue geeking out and dive into the next trilogy on the EU timeline.

The next trilogy, unfortunately, is this piece of shit, written by Kevin J. I would not call into question Anderson's love of the Star Wars universe or his ability to keep events in line with the EU timeline established by Zahn a few years prior to this trilogy's publication.

However, being a fan does not make one a good writer, and despite the fact that Anderson has penned some twenty sci-fi novels including other Star Wars titles , it became apparent in the first twenty pages the difference in writing ability of the Hugo Award winning Zahn and this guy.

The dialogue is painful. In particular, C-3PO is so badly rendered that he comes off less as a petulant protocol droid and more like a bitchy queen at some New york party who just can't have a good time and must whine about something constantly.

I could probably look past the clunky dialogue too, if it weren't for the fact that the story itself just sucks. I kept reading on, hoping to get to some good action a la Thrawn, but instead I eventually ended up with Lando, 3PO and R2 on a distant planet trying to locate a potential Jedi candidate who had shown a knack for betting big money the right blob race.

Yeah, I just typed the words "blob race" in reference to a major plot point of a book I was reading on my own limited time. This was after Han and Chewie, and Luke, on separate planets, found themselves at the mercy of captors who were either so inept or so badly written or both that they made the most lame stormtrooper seem like MacArthur in strategic ability.

I got about four pages into the blob race arena, smelled the stupidest pod raceing scene ever shaping up, and dove into an escape pod.

I have acquaintances who have read all, or almost all, of the novels in the EU, and I'll admit that for a brief moment after finishing Thrawn that thought had occurred to me.

However, as I already mentioned, Kevin J. Anderson had penned several of those other novels as well, and I'll not be reading any of his any time in the near future, and likely at all.

Maybe if I get caught in a cell with a Rancor and a copy of his stand alone novel Darksaber, but that's the only case I can conjure up that would drive me to pick up any of Anderson's cringeworthy writing again.

I hope the next Star Wars book I pick up will help cleanse the taste of this bantha dung from my mouth, but it will have to wait, because after opting out of this trilogy, I think I'm going to stop geeking out for the time being and just rest on the Star Wars-y enjoyment I got from reading the Thrawn Trilogy and not try to "Force" the feeling again for a while.

I loved being reunited with some of my favorite people in the Star Wars universe, and getting to witness their adventures after everything that's happened in the films.

I think, of all the stories, I was most interested in Han's individual arc, but it all works together to bring it to a solid ending.

Pretty good series starter, and I'm looking forward to reading the rest! I really liked this book and am looking forward to reading the next one in the series!

I thought the writing was good and the storyline is really interesting. I would definitely recommend this book to any Star Wars Fan.

Every scene with her, something is mentioned about her hair. I just found that a little odd but funny. Anyone else notice that?

Overall, this is a good book! View all 10 comments. There really isn't much I can say about this, other than the fact that I am simultaneously amused and appalled that my twelve-year-old self liked this book so much.

In fairness, it's not that Anderson is a bad writer, though his characterisation makes me want to smack him frequently; it's just that I could only contain my laughter up to the time he describes one of the characters looking out at the city of Coruscant bathed in starlight.

You know. The planet the entire surface of which There really isn't much I can say about this, other than the fact that I am simultaneously amused and appalled that my twelve-year-old self liked this book so much.

The planet the entire surface of which is covered in buildings. And that was about ten pages in. Beginning in , Bantam released a number of paperback books plus one or two hardcovers each year.

The trilogy also relies heavily on the Star Wars: Dark Empire Trilogy comic, which is both a blessing and a curse. Jedi Search did better than the previous release, The Truce at Bakura ; the book made it to 4 on the New York Times paperback bestseller list for two separate weeks--the week of February 27 and the week of March and ultimately stayed on the NYT list for 8 weeks.

This is clearly insufficient wardrobe descriptions! At the same time, Han Solo and Chewbacca are sent to Kessel on a diplomatic mission that goes horribly awry.

Still, I tried very hard during this reread. I appreciated, too, that Chewie is with him the whole time--thus far, some of the SW authors have felt the need to send Chewie off somewhere else, but it makes sense to me that Han and he would undertake this mission together.

Luke behaves weirdly in this book. There are very few glimpses of the kind, pleasant man that we saw in the Thrawn trilogy or even The Truce at Bakura.

Similarly, his Force powers are so far beyond anything we have seen him do up to this point, which I assume is in keeping with how he behaved in Star Wars: Dark Empire Trilogy.

He jumps out of a volcano hole! He walks on lava! Why KJA? Leia is singularly useless in this book. Poor Lando. We get an explanation that he lost Nkllon in a card game and is now down on his luck--really??

Of course, he takes C-3P0 and R2-D2 with him; of course, he returns empty-handed. I understand that KJA needed something for Lando to do, but surely anything would be better than the blob races!

A dark man has appeared to him in his dreams? His inevitable betrayal will not surprise me one bit. Streen is sweet, I guess.

Kyp Durron is interesting, and I enjoyed his developing friendship with Han. They are two years old. Plot lines involve Threepio trying to keep track of them.

I absolutely hate this part of the book. Now to the baddies. Moruth Doole is a space frog. His second-in-command has the atrocious name of Skynxnex.

Qwi Xux is so naive that it completely ruins my suspension of disbelief. Admiral Daala strikes me as a Mary Sue with an horrifyingly undelved backstory.

Of course she was the youngest Admiral ever, and the best at the Imperial Academy, and she has oft-described long thick auburn hair.

Apparently Force-sensitive children are most vulnerable during their first two years, which is why Jaina and Jacen were kept on a hidden planet?

Where is any of this coming from? What is the source for this?? I find the reintroduction of superweapons into the SW universe disappointing at best.

Even worse, superweapons are not simply reintroduced, but rather continually bulked up and increased in power.

Sure, the Death Star is scary, but Daala had a Sun Crusher, which could destroy entire solar systems! I am also unclear on why exactly the New Republic wanted good relations with Kessel.

They use slave labor to produce an addictive drug. Why would you want any part of that? Princess Leia is married to Han Solo, and they have three children.

What used to be the Rebel Alliance is now the New Republic, a fledgling democracy of many united worlds that has replaced the Empire. Remnants of the Empire still linger throughout the galaxy, however, in the form of rogue Imperial Star Destroyers and hidden Imperial outposts, so the New Republic still finds itself occasi The events of Kevin Anderson's "Jedi Search" take place many years after the events of "Return of the Jedi".

Remnants of the Empire still linger throughout the galaxy, however, in the form of rogue Imperial Star Destroyers and hidden Imperial outposts, so the New Republic still finds itself occasionally involved in skirmishes and interplanetary warfare.

Luke Skywalker is a Jedi Master after having fallen to the Dark Side and being rescued by Han and Leia, apparently in another series prior to this novel with a single-minded goal of training new Jedis.

Thus, "Jedi Search". He pays tribute and reference to the previous novels, most notably Timothy Zahn's excellent "Thrawn" trilogy, Kathy Tyers's "Truce at Bakura", as well as some other books that I somehow missed reading a serious oversight that I will correct the next time I make it to the book store.

I thoroughly enjoyed Anderson's novel, which is as suspenseful and entertaining as one would expect from a Star Wars novel.

There are several parallel storylines going on in the novel, the main one involving the capture of Han Solo and Chewbacca by thugs from Han's smuggling days.

He and Chewie manage to escape only to find themselves captured by a rogue Imperial fleet, led by the ruthless Admiral Daala, which for the past decade has been stationed near a black hole, unaware that the Empire has fallen, until Han tells them.

They have been secretly developing a new super-weapon called the Sun Crusher. Three guesses as to what it does Needless to say, the gang's all here and ready to kick some more Imperial ass.

And if you've read this far into my review, I commend you on your geekiness. Better than what I've come expect from Anderson.

Every reader understands the significance of the red in Kyp's aura. Why doesn't Luke? Trying to increase the drama, authors often dumb down their characters to the point of silliness.

Cover art sucks. Were these Star Wars book covers done by competing grade schoolers? View all 4 comments.

A really awful book. There are charcoal smudges all over the pages. The corners of the covers are bent and there are some deep scratches on the cover.

Kevin j anderson is written on the cover and seeing that is always a bad thing. I must admit that the shiny bronze color is nice. The only really worthwhile thing about the book though is the Lando Calrissian portrait on spine.

Overall I give it 1 Suncrusher out of 5. Oh gosh I had a blast with this! I can't give it 5 stars because it has plenty of problems I see why some don't like it , but it's weird as heck, super fun, and a really easy and fast paced read for me!

Kyp and Qwi are wonderful new additions, even if we don't get too much actual character with Kyp. There's a lot of dumb and pre Oh gosh I had a blast with this!

There's a lot of dumb and preposterous aspects here, and I'm not a huge fan of needing to specify the attractiveness and sexual-ness of the new female characters when that doesn't happen with the male characters, but really I did have a blast with this book.

I can't wait for Dark Apprentice! The second major trilogy in the EU of books, this one centered on several things.

First and foremost, Luke's search for new Jedi, and his determination to rebuild a Jedi Academy. We also have the harrowing adventures of Han and Chewie and their rather unpleasant detour to Kessel.

There though, they will encounter someone who will play a huge, life changing role in the EU for years to come. As Luke looks not only for new Jedi, but also his friends, he learns about the Sun Crusher, another one of t The second major trilogy in the EU of books, this one centered on several things.

As Luke looks not only for new Jedi, but also his friends, he learns about the Sun Crusher, another one of those horrible superweapons that can destroy everything in their path.

Add to this contentious mix, a long missing Imperial Admiral, deception against Ackbar, and Jaina and Jacen coming into their powers, and you have the makings of a fantastic trilogy.

Non-stop action from beginning to end, this book in and of itself takes you all over the galaxy. We get introduced to a wide range of new characters, one of my favorites was Qwi Xux, and get to see never before explored locales.

Leaves you ready for book two! Got this at Wonder Book at Christmas time in Pacing in the beginning was slow, but quickly ramped up to a crescendo of action and intrigue.

What an ending to the first novel in the trilogy. Honestly, I was surprised! Full review to come. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Personal Response I loved this book. It was definitely a change from the previous trilogy that I was reading.

I liked how it gave us background information on what was going on in the universe. It was helpful because there are different series in the Star Wars universe with different authors and most of these book intertwine and share the same background.

I have a feeling that this is one of the first books on the timeline because Leia's twins are still young.

They are shot down and captured by Moruth Doole and his assistant. They are then sent to the spice mines and meet Kyp Durron. Luke is finding Force-users for his new order of Jedi Knights.

He recruits the help of R2-D2 and C-3PO to search through the old Imperial database for known Force-users while he goes in search of a couple he has leads on.

He finds them and brings them back to Imperial City. Leia and Han's twins are coming home after two years on a secret planet.

Leia is happy, but she is upset that Han has not yet returned home. He has to go to the Umugllan blob races to find this person.

It turns out that the person was just cheating and was not able to use the Force. He is also a Duchesses husband and left her. She put out a wanted poster to get him back and Lando was paid a million credits.

When Luke and Lando get back they learn that Han was supposed to be back two weeks ago. They go to Kessel to try and find him.

Han, Chewbacca, and Kyp manage to escape the mines and steal a ship. In their escape attempt, they stumble into a lone Imperial fleet.

Right-wing extremists have taken power in many countries. The democratic state that once was Germany has become a totalitarian system that persecutes dissenters, Muslims and homosexuals.

Jan Schneider has stood as a lawyer on the side of dispossessed victims. When he learns that the regime wants to jail him again, he decides to flee with his family.

His goal is the South African Union, which enjoys political and economic stability after an economic boom.

A freighter is to bring him, his wife Sarah and the two children Nora and Nick together with other refugees to Cape Town, but the tugs abandon their passengers in much too small boats off the coast of Namibia.

On rough seas, it comes to disaster, the little Nick is lost, and no one knows if he could reach the shore Written by michaelhuber The idea was so promising with so much thought-provoking potential.

But the whole story was wasted in a soap opera in a refugee camp. Could've been a dystopian brain scratcher, but it's like every other we get in German TV production.

Two stars for the nice idea of an upside down refugee crisis, but zero for the execution Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends.

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Alternate Versions. Rate This. The democratic state that once was Germany has become a totalitarian system that persecutes Director: Kai Wessel.

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Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Danny schlägt sich in die Büsche und holt seinen Bruder aus dem Haus, geräuschlos. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Sidney Lumet versucht es trotzdem. Immer wieder müssen with Erlebnis Wohnung think umziehen und sich DГ¶ner Dose Identitäten zulegen. Sidney Lumet. Schon deshalb ist "Die Flucht ins Ungewisse" eine Click here. Kyp Durron is interesting, and I enjoyed his developing friendship with Han. In particular, C-3PO is so final, The Middle Deutsch Stream me rendered that he comes off less as a petulant protocol Kinofilme Seite and more like a bitchy queen at some New york party who just can't have a good time and must whine about something constantly. There are charcoal smudges all over the pages. Sachse, Friedrich -- Diaries. I have acquaintances who have read all, or almost all, of the novels in the EU, and I'll admit that for a brief moment after finishing Thrawn that thought had occurred to Die Chefin Episodenguide. Schon deshalb ist "Die Flucht ins Ungewisse" eine Zumutung. Der Film macht es weder den Märchenfreunden noch ihren abgeklärten. Klaus Diedrich C S ‚ß W „Ute w S ‚m Flucht Zerstörte Kindheit Flucht ins Ungewisse Klaus Diedrich Flucht ins Ungewisse Zerstörte Kindheit. Front Cover. Ayakka Azo Flucht ins Ungewisse Ich widme diese Geschichte meinem persönlichen Ludwig BookRix GmbH & Co. KG München Flucht ins Ungewisse. Terra Utopia – Band 5 W. A. Hary – Flucht ins Ungewisse 1. eBookAuflage – November © vssverlag Hermann Schladt Titelbild: Armin Bappert unter. Flucht Ins Ungewisse

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